About Matzo

Matzo is unleavened bread that first appeared on the “market” when the Israelites had to flee Egypt and did not have time to let their bread rise. It has been eaten for centuries during the Jewish holiday of Passover to remind the Jews of this difficult time. Today, matzo has evolved into a multi-flavored, multi-purpose food. It is no longer just matzo for Passover and matzo for the Jews. Consumers from a myriad of backgrounds utilize matzo year-round.

Types of Matzo

There are two kinds of matzo, Ashkenazic (the most common) and Sephardic. The most widely used Ashkenazic matzo looks like and tastes similar to a cracker, is square in shape and made by machine. Another type of Ashkenazic matzo, known as Shmurah, is round, approximately one foot in diameter and made by hand. Shmurah means “guarded,” and this matzo took on that name because it is supervised by Rabbis to ensure that no fermentation has occurred. Sephardic matzo is eaten by Sephardic Jews. It is soft and has a consistency similar to a pita or tortilla.

 

Matzo Facts

Since matzo was traditionally made by hand and was round, the idea of changing how the matzo was made and shaped caused some individuals to believe that the square machine made matzo was not in any way traditional and therefore less kosher.

In 1912, due to demands of technology and packaging, Manischewitz started making their matzo square.

In 1838 a Jewish man named Issac Singer invented the first machine for rolling matzo.

Originally, matzos were round and made by hand in temples.

Before Passover begins you are supposed to remove all of the leavening from your home.

In the Torah, Passover is referred to as Pesach or Chag HaMatzot, meaning “Feast of the Unleavened Bread.”

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Matzo Outside the Box is dedicated to all things matzo, with recipes for year-round use and a blog written from the perspective of Bernie Mendelbaum... more

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  • In the Torah, Passover is referred to as Pesach or Chag HaMatzot, meaning “Feast of the Unleavened Bread.”